Gamification – how to

How to get started

Bottom-Up Approach

  1. Identify activities the game will include
  2. Assign a point value to each activity (may all be equal)
  3. Assign each activity to a level
  4. Assign each level an aggregate point value required to move to the next level
  5. Make level 2 inaccessible until the point value on level 1 is achieved, and do the same for all subsequent levels
  6. Provide a way to keep track of points and levels
  7. A player “beats the game” by progressing through all levels and finally achieving the aggregate point value of the last level

Top-Down Approach

  1. Identify the end objective (the skill players should develop)
  2. Identify activities which will guide the player to develop that skill
  3. Place the activities in levels, making levels progressively more advanced / challenging (important: each level should include activities with an array of difficulty levels to ensure that each player can attain the required point value for each level)
  4. Assign each level an aggregate point value required to move to the next level
  5. Make level 2 inaccessible until the point value on level 1 is achieved, and do the same for all subsequent levels
  6. Provide a way to keep track of points and levels
  7. A player “beats the game” by progressing through all levels and finally achieving the aggregate point value of the last level

Look at how you can add Gamification to your existing tools and pedagogy

Modern Learning Management Systems have gamification plugins such as badges and leader boards that could be used to encourage participation in an aspect of your course.  This could be posting on a class Wiki.

This article covers the Lure of badges and gives advice on how and when to use them : Blackboard article

Use a Gamification Framework

World of ClassCraft http://www.classcraft.com/en/  is a gamification framework for classroom teachers.

Contact

During class, the teacher plays the role of game master. Students call out the actions they want to perform, during a regular class, and the teacher inputs them in the platform. During a one-hour class, game management occupies roughly 5 minutes. Our experience show that students are very motivated (including girls) to perform in the game. The motivation to gain real life powers, the randomness of the events and the risk involved in avoiding death are all factors that make the game motivating. To our knowledge, Classcraft, is the the only example of gamification in education to completely transform the classroom into a large-scale game. Moreover, Classcraft is subject-agnostic, in the sense that it can be played in any subject. Another advantage of Classcraft is that it can be implemented without all the students having to play; students who don’t want to play (something like 10%, generally) don’t have to.

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